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Eurasian Society of Educational Research
Eurasian Society of Educational Research
Christiaan Huygensstraat 44, Zipcode:7533XB, Enschede, THE NETHERLANDS
Eurasian Society of Educational Research
Headquarters
Christiaan Huygensstraat 44, Zipcode:7533XB, Enschede, THE NETHERLANDS

Volume 7 Issue 2 (June 2024)

Using R for Multivariate Meta-analysis on Educational Psychology Data: A Method Study

educational psychology data metasem package multivariate meta-analysis r tutorial

Gamon Savatsomboon , Prasert Ruannakarn , Phamornpun Yurayat , Ong-art Chanprasitchai , Jibon Kumar Sharma Leihaothabam


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Using R to conduct univariate meta-analyses is becoming common for publication. However, R can also conduct multivariate meta-analysis (MMA). However, newcomers to both R and MMA may find using R to conduct MMA daunting. Given that, R may not be easy for those unfamiliar with coding. Likewise, MMA is a topic of advanced statistics. Thus, it may be very challenging for most newcomers to conduct MMA using R. If this holds, this can be viewed as a practice gap. In other words, the practice gap is that researchers are not capable of using R to conduct MMA in practice. This is problematic. This paper alleviates this practice gap by illustrating how to use R (the metaSEM package) to conduct MMA on educational psychology data. Here, the metaSEM package is used to obtain the required MMA text outputs. However, the metaSEM package is not capable of producing the other required graphical outputs. As a result, the metafor package is also used as a complimentary to generate the required graphical outputs. Ultimately, we hope that our audience will be able to apply what they learn from this method paper to conduct MMA using R in their teaching, research, and publication.

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10.12973/ejper.7.2.55
Pages: 55-64
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The current study investigates the academic adaptation levels of international students and their motivations for pursuing higher education in Turkey. The study also aimed to compare the adaptation of international students in higher education in terms of various variables such as gender, age, duration in Turkey, education level, and university. A mixed-methods design was employed, incorporating both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The study involved 222 international students from four universities in Konya who completed an online questionnaire. Data collection used the "international students’ adaptation to higher education" scale. The quantitative data in this study were subjected to statistical analyses, using non-parametric tests such as the Mann– Whitney U test and the Kruskal– Wallis H test, while the qualitative data were analyzed using the content analysis technique. Because of the analysis, it was noted that international students demonstrated heightened levels of adaptation in the realms of academic processes, academic principles, and socio-cultural dimensions of university life. However, a moderate level of adaptation was identified in the domain of academic experiences, shedding light on some challenges encountered by students in this aspect. Additionally, the results showed no significant differences in academic adaptation levels among international students based on study variables. Concerning the motivations of international students to pursue higher education in Turkey, prominent factors encompass the quality and diversity of higher education opportunities, historical and cultural heritage, ease of living, affordability, and religious and ethnic ties. This underscores the importance of universities and policymakers in Turkey to recognize challenges and promote the strengths of the country as an international study destination.

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10.12973/ejper.7.2.65
Pages: 65-81
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This study investigates school-age children’s arithmetic operations performance while solving larger-size problems which produces interferences in memory. Complex problems can trigger competing responses in working memory, which are irrelevant to a task goal and increase the likelihood of interference from previously learned problems (De Visscher et al., 2018). Interference control in working memory is required to be able to manage and suppress irrelevant information while performing cognitive tasks such as arithmetic problem-solving (Unsworth, 2010). The present study explores potential cognitive processes while performing arithmetic tasks and emphasizes the important role of interference control for better performance in such tasks. This study applied a mixed-effect model experimental design. Forty-four primary school children were involved in the study. The results showed that children’s performance in terms of correct responses was similar for both small-size and large-size problems. However, their response speed was significantly lower in larger-size problems, which created more interference in working memory.

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10.12973/ejper.7.2.83
Pages: 83-92
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This study used the COVID Social Mobility and Opportunities (COSMO) Study to examine home learning and parent attitudes to education during Covid-19 in relation to demographic and household financial circumstances and parent educational aspirations. The findings showed that White, female, and degree-educated parents were more likely than their counterparts to report positive attitudes to home learning, support their 16-year-olds’ learning, and contact schools during the lockdowns. Parents who experienced food poverty and reported being financially worse off after the pandemic were less likely to support home learning or contact schools but reported largely positive attitudes to learning. Also, parents who reported lower educational aspirations were more likely to support their children’s learning, reflecting their educational needs. This study contributes to our understanding of home learning during the pandemic and has implications for public policy and action regarding supporting children’s learning during health crises and reducing education inequalities.

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10.12973/ejper.7.2.93
Pages: 93-107
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