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Eurasian Society of Educational Research
Eurasian Society of Educational Research
Christiaan Huygensstraat 44, Zipcode:7533XB, Enschede, THE NETHERLANDS
Eurasian Society of Educational Research
Headquarters
Christiaan Huygensstraat 44, Zipcode:7533XB, Enschede, THE NETHERLANDS

'interpersonal relationship' Search Results



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This study examined teachers’ attributions and emotions for their subjectively perceived interpersonal relationships with their students as positive or negative, and whether hope (pathways thinking, agency thinking) influences the perceived positive or negative interpersonal relationships, the subsequent attributions and emotions, and the impact of attributions on emotions. Fifty teachers, of both genders, completed the questionnaire for each of their five students who were randomly selected from their teaching classes. The results revealed that the positive interpersonal relationships were predominately attributed to stable, personally controllable and self-student controllable factors, whereas the negative interpersonal relationships were primarily attributed to external, external controllable, unstable, and self-student controllable factors. Also, teachers reported positive emotions of high intensity (sympathy, cheerfulness, exciting, love, not anger, calmness) for the positive relationships, and negative emotions of moderate intensity (no enthusiasm, shame, anxiety, no excitement) for the negative relationships. Yet, the high hope teachers made adaptive attributional and emotional appraisals for the positive and, mainly, negative interpersonal relationships. Agency thinking, as compared to pathway thinking, was a better and worse formulator of the appraisals in negative and positive interpersonal relationships, respectively. Hope, additionally, had direct effect on the emotions, beyond that afforded by attributions, particularly in negative interpersonal relationships.

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10.12973/ejper.3.1.13
Pages: 13-38
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Assessing College Students’ Social and Emotional Strengths: A Cross-Cultural Comparison from Mexico, United States, and Spain

covitality higher education measurement invariance social emotional health survey

Michael J. Furlong , José A. Piqueras , Leticia Chacón-Gutiérrez , Erin Dowdy , Karen Nylund-Gibson , Meiki Chan , Victoria Soto-Sanz , Juan C. Marzo , Tíscar Rodríguez-Jiménez , Agustín E. Martínez-González


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Endeavors supporting college students’ positive psychosocial development are gaining attention and investment in various countries and social contexts. Higher education experiences provide new academic, social, and vocational advancement opportunities at a critical developmental stage. However, higher education can also cause distress due to the challenges and stressors present during this new stage of increased independence. The Social Emotional Health Survey-Higher Education (SEHS-HE) assesses the core psychosocial strengths of individuals transitioning from secondary schools into institutions of higher education (IHE) to aid campus student support services. The present study sought to extend the SEHS-HE research by examining its application with college student samples from Mexico (n = 4,207), United States (n = 1,638), and Spain (n = 1,734). Confirmatory factor analyses investigated the hypothesized SEHS-HE higher-order factor model. The Mexico sample returned an acceptable model fit, but the USA and Spain samples had a suboptimal fit; hence, we explored alternative models. A two-level structure had full invariance for all three samples. This study extends the current scholarship on the conceptual model and psychometric properties of SEHS-HE. The discussion focuses on implications for future research to enhance SEHS-HE in national and cross-national research and practice.

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10.12973/ejper.4.2.123
Pages: 123-137
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Dark Triad Personality and Online Trolling: The Mediating Role of Empathy

cyberpsychology dark triad empathy online trolling undergraduates

Erdal Hamarta , Muhammed Akat , Ömer Faruk Akbulut


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Online trolling is online behavior in which the troll provokes, harms, and pretends to be someone else to achieve their goals. The purpose of trolls may be to harm the other person, but they can also be for entertainment purposes. Online trolling, for whatever purpose, can have significant psychological effects on individuals and people who are socially exposed. In addition, online trolling is becoming more common every day. However, there are very few studies on trolling. Therefore, the study aims to examine the mediating role of empathy in the relationship between dark triad personality traits and levels of online trolling. For this purpose, structural equation modeling and bootstrapping method was used. The participants comprised 516 (%71.6 females; %28.4 males) undergraduates. The ages of the participants ranged from 18 to 31 (X̄ = 21.09). The measures used included the Online Trolling Scale, Dirty Dozen Scale, and Toronto Empathy Questionnaire. In the study, it was found that there were significant relationships between the dark triad, online trolling, and empathy. Also, the results of the structural equation model showed that the effect of the dark triad on online trolling was mediated by empathy. This result was found to be significant with bootstrapping.

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10.12973/ejper.6.1.45
Pages: 45-53
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This study explored the impact of the peer support programme on pupils at Japanese technical high school for over 6 years. A total of 268 pupils (an intervention group 112; a control group 114) were invited for the study and the pupils of the intervention group were given peer support training and they joined its supporting activities. All the pupils were assessed three times by adopting IRS, RSES10 and GHQ28. The results showed that the programme seemed to give positive influences on the peer supporters in terms of IRS, RSES10 and GHQ28. Also, both group members were classified into low-scoring groups and high-scoring groups, depending on their scores at the first assessment. Then, the results of analysis showed that the pupils from both low & high -scoring groups significantly improved their scores in IRS. In RSES10 and GHQ28, the pupils from the low-scoring groups improved their scores, but those from the high-scoring groups did not improve much. As a conclusion, even in a technical high school where the majority of pupils was male pupils (over 90%), the peer support programme seemed to give positive influences on the peer supporters in terms of IRS, RSES10 and GHQ28.  

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10.12973/ejper.6.2.85
Pages: 85-96
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Previous research focused on individuals’ background, contexts and cognitive performance in education, work, and life. Given the increasing number of people living alone temporarily, the question arises whether the frequent use of skills, including social skills, relates to individuals’ later positively self-evaluated skills and social lives. Based on an integrated framework, the current analysis aimed to disentangle these relationships with longitudinal data from Germany over three years. The target sample consisted of n = 3263 working adults. A Bayesian structural equation model included adults’ frequent use of skills, self-evaluated skills, household size, close friends, and seven covariates (e.g., numeracy and literacy test scores, weekly working hours. The results suggested positive relationships between adults’ frequent use of numeracy, literacy, and social skills and later self-evaluations (except literacy used on self-evaluated numeracy). Those who less frequently used social skills three years earlier were also less likely to have a larger household size than those who reporting frequently using their social skills. Adults who frequently used literacy skills three years earlier reported higher numbers of close friends than those who less frequently used literacy. The findings highlight the importance of adults’ social skills and frequently used skills for self-evaluated numeracy and literacy.

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10.12973/ejper.6.2.97
Pages: 97-118
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This study aimed to explore how the peer support programme gave influences on technical high school pupils in Japan. The study invited a total 76 pupils (37 in an intervention group and 39 in a control group) to be involved into the peer support programme and assessments. The participants were annually assessed three times by adopting four scales, which examined their interpersonal relationship level, self-esteem, mental health, and school environmental adaptation states. The results showed that pupils in the intervention group (the peer supporters) tended to improve their own skills and abilities in terms of all the scales after joining the programme. Also, in terms of Adaptation Scale for School Environments on Six Spheres (ASSESS), which was a newly developed scale, there were no significant positive influences in both areas of “fulfillments in study” and “peer support activities against bullying”. As a conclusion, even in the technical high school where the majority of pupils were male, the peer support programme gave positive influences on the intervention group (the peer supporters) in terms of interpersonal relationship level, self-esteem, mental health, and school environmental adaptation states.

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10.12973/ejper.7.1.1
Pages: 1-10
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